Saturday, January 14, 2012

Pickled Brussel Sprouts

I just love winter canning projects!  There's usually no sense of urgency caused by the need to get the half bushel of perfectly ripe peaches in the jar or the box of tomatoes made into salsa before they spoil.   Winter canning projects call for winter vegetables that are usually very patient and can wait around for a while until there's time to get to them.  Winter is the season for citrus and since we can't grow citrus in Michigan,  I've got no qualms in getting storebought when my schedule permits putting up some crimson honey grapefruit when big bags of Florida produce show up at the grocery store, priced right, or some Major Grey's chutney when mangoes are plentiful.   During winter at the Ann Arbor Farmer's Market, Brussel Sprouts are plentiful.   I pickled a batch on Christmas Eve morning this year - the combination of the green sprouts and red peppers looked festive.   I did have to buy the red peppers at the store - but next year, I could make this recipe completely local by drying some red peppers in the summertime, and adding some to each jar.    The sprouts go great with winter meals - I especially enjoyed them with this New Year's batch of Hoppin' John.



Pickled Brussel Sprouts
12 cups small brussel sprouts - cut large ones in half
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 cups sugar
2 cups thinly sliced onions
1 cup diced sweet red peppers
2 tbsp mustard seed
1 tbsp celery seed
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes

Wash brussel sprouts  and remove stems and blemished outer leaves and boil in salt water (4 tsp canning salt per gallon of water) for 4 minutes. Drain and cool. Combine vinegar, sugar, onion, diced red pepper, and spices in large saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer 5 minutes. Distribute onion and diced pepper among jars. Fill jars with pieces and pickling solution, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.
Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes (for altitudes <1000 ft).  Makes about 5 pints.

2 comments:

Vivienne said...

So can these be eaten like a salad, or are they more of a condiment?

I've had very good success with freezing roasted and peeled red peppers from my garden. I imagine that they would work in this recipe.

Cynthia said...

They are eaten like a salad - I put them on top the beans because they tasted good that way